h1

The work of Rose Borchovski

May 22, 2009

Art work of Rose Borchovski

Last night I visited a new exhibit which presented the work of Rose Borchovski and artist in SL who is represented by S&S Gallery of Fine Arts.

A notecard from the gallery introduced the work under the title The Last Susas

This is the story of Susa Hubble
Who went to bed single and woke up double

There was no holding on after that
Some were happy, others sad
They all came in the same tiny size
Had short little fingers
And blue round eyes

All of a sudden it stopped finally
And they ended up with thirty-three

As soon as I entered the gallery space  cocooned in blue, I was stuck by the strong linear narrative in this work.

Works of art have often told a story with subject matter derived from sources such as literature, scripture, mythology, history, or current events. Throughout the history of Art, artists have used stories to illustrate aspects of what it is to be human. However Modernists largely rejected narrative elements in art. At one stage if you wanted to quietly insult an artist you inferred the work was illustrative or decorative. To narrate was definitely a sin.

Thankfully with post-modernism the use of narrative and image has returned, as is not dismissed quite so easily.  Narrative is now a strategy a contemporary artist can use to make sense of the world in which we live or share an experience.

The narratives of Rose Borchovski interrogate what it is to be virtual, which highlights age old questions which we never tire of, i.e. the question of what it is to be human.

This bitter sweet story is very much worth the visit.  Rose Borchovski’s work is currently showing at S&S Gallery of Fine Arts gallery the SLurl is below.

SLURL:  http://slurl.com/secondlife/Portabello/134/123/266

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. […] Susa Bubble exhibition July 26, 2009 I have written before about the evocative and haunting work of work of Rose Borchovski so it was with great interest I read the invitation to view part two of the Sasa Bubble […]


  2. […] have pondered the evocative narrative qualities of the work of Susa Bubble creator  Rose Borchovski before, but this was a reaction to still images in a gallery […]



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: